“Better you leave here with your head still full of kitty cats and puppy dogs”

la confidential

 

My head was in a very bad place after reading this book. That’s not to say that it wasn’t a great book, but plot is so serpentine and gritty it makes the 1997 film version look like a Pixar short (opening sequence of Up notwithstanding). James Ellroy’s vision of 1950s Los Angeles is dark, mean and merciless. There are no “good guys.” There are only hard, jaded men whose demons push them to pursue some form of justice and none of them come away unscathed. That’s not hyperbole.

The three main characters, Edmund Exley, Wendell “Bud” White and Jack “Trashcan Jack” Vincennes have their fates intertwined by the “Bloody Christmas” scandal, a real-life even involving the severe beating of several civilians by LAPD officers in 1951. The subsequent departmental shake up sets all three men on a path involving police corruption, murder, drugs and vice connecting to the highest levels of society. It’s hard to say much more about the plot, not because of spoilers but because it so dense.

This book was really damned good but it’s not for the faint of heart. Everyone in it, even the protagonists, are ugly. Every awful thing that can be done to a person seems to happen at some point in this book. But it’s also very smartly written and keeps you guessing.

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“Space around me where my soul can breathe”

introvert advantage

I don’t think I’ve ever read a “self help” book before. It’s not that I don’t think I could do with some improvement. I often find their advice to be overly simplistic or that they take a “one size fits all” approach to many of life’s problems. Ms. Olsen’s book has some of these issues but is generally easy to read. She divides her books into small, easy to digest sections making it easy to read before bed.

I would say one of the biggest issues with this book is that a lot of the information has become old news in the 15 or so years since it was first published. We all know that introverts get their energy from quiet time spent alone and that extroverts are just the opposite and that we prefer substantive conversations to small talk. On any given day one can find approximately 50 memes about being an introvert on their Facebook feed. I also found that she tended to view people in very black and white terms with regard to introverts and extroverts. That being said, there were some helpful tips on getting along in a society that seems to be built for the extrovert. She gives advice for relationships, the workplace, meeting people, social obligations and many other situations (I skipped the chapters on parenting).

Overall, this book is helpful if not particularly groundbreaking in 2017. I am already utilizing some of her advice at my job and it seems to be working.

“Never saw no miracle of science that didn’t always end up as something worse.”

never let me go

 

It’s been about 3 days since I finished this book and I’m still not entirely sure how I feel about it. This is first book by Kazuo Ishigiro. This review will be a little more succinct than my typical review because it’s hard to go too deep into the plot without spoiling things. The basic story follows Kathy, Ruth and Tommy; three friends who are students at a school called Hailsham and the years after they move on from their education. It becomes apparent pretty quickly that there is something very different about Hailsham and its students. I figured out pretty quickly how things were going to go and how it would likely end but this in no way effected my enjoyment of it. While I can’t say I enjoyed this book which is deeply sad, it is beautifully written. It’s not the emotional gut punch of watching “Requiem for a Dream” but there is a pervading sense of quiet sadness throughout the book from beginning to end.

“Life itself is the proper binge”

my life in france

 

This book will remain forever on my shelf as something to read when I need to feel better about life, or for when I am feeling somewhat directionless. Julia Child’s memoir spoke to me on an extremely deep level. I already knew I loved her, now I idolize her. Watching her jump fearlessly from life in a foreign country in which she barely spoke the language, to cooking, to “cookery bookery” and finally into hosting a cooking show without allowing fear to hold her back is inspiring. I don’t typically use language like this for book reviews but I fell in love with this one from the first chapter.

“My Life in France” details Julia’s life from the time she arrived in France with her husband Paul for his job with OSIS through her return to the United States and the publication of “Mastering the Art of French Cooking” volumes 1 and 2. Julia’s excitement and love for the nation of France and it’s people is evident from the start. Though told chronologically, it is more a series of memories about a pivotal time in her life. Though it is not without conflict, Julia does not dwell too much on the more difficult aspects of her life. She and Paul viewed most inconveniences and discomforts as part of a great adventure rather than anything to fret over.

I cannot recommend this book enough. Julia Child’s memoir is inspiring and lovely to read.

Seriously, just call the cops.

boy in the suitcase

I really wanted to like this book more than I did. But I foundĀ  Nina Borg, the main character in this first of Danish Mysteries to be infuriating and hard to relate to. Perhaps there is something I’m missing about Danish society and the way government employees react to foreigners, because many other people seem to think this book is excellent. But when someone like myself, who believes in a healthy mistrust of authority, is screaming “Lady, call the police and go home to your family!” it makes the book hard to enjoy.

Nina Bork works as a Red Cross Nurse and it’s clear from the jump that she takes her job Personally. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing since Nina’s patients are refugees who are often resented and disdained by Danish society. But Nina is often absent from her husband and two children. She is convinced by an estranged friend to pick up a suitcase in a storage locker which contains a small boy who is drugged but alive. She realizes quickly that there are extremely dangerous (who don’t seem to be associated with the police) people looking for this boy. I realize that calling the authorities at this point wouldn’t have made for a very exciting story. But the fact that Nina chooses to take this task on by herself, even after people start dying, made the rest of the story very difficult for me to get into.

Honestly, I can’t say that I enjoyed this book much but I’m in the minority. So…maybe pick it up?

“We’re all wired into a survival trip now.”

transmetropolotin

The first volume of Transmetropolitin is almost twenty years old and is still as disturbingly as relevant as it was in 1998. Warren Ellis’ twisted dystopian future doesn’t seem so far fetched given current events. I didn’t catch it at in its original release, much to my shame. I was worried that it wouldn’t hold up over time. I can’t say I’m 100% pleased to discover I was wrong.

Spider Jerusalem a journalist who, by Ellis’ own admission was modeled after Hunter S. Thompson, is forced out of his self imposed exile by his publisher to whom he still owes 3 more books. In order to write, he has to live in a society that he hates. In order to make a living in the society he hates, he has to go back to reporting…the job that he hates. Despite his loathing, it’s clear that Jerusalem’s journalistic voice is deeply compelling and possibly the antidote that this ailing culture needs. He is joined on his adventures by Channon Yarrow, an assistant forced on him by his editor to make sure he gets his work done. Channon, of course has no control over Spider. But she does help keep him tethered to his basic humanity.

If you haven’t read Transmetropolitin, you really should. If you haven’t read it since its original publication, you really should. It’s an angry, vulgar but deeply intelligent comment on modern culture.

Gunpowder, gelatin. Dynamite with a laser beam

rat queens 1

 

I was skeptical about this graphic novel when I picked it up. I’d been looking for some more female-centric stories and I’ve been a Dungeons and Dragons player practically from the time I was in the womb. The description of this book sounded possibly fun but potentially more character quirks than actual story. I’m definitely glad I took a chance.

Reading Rat Queens is a bit like playing a table top RPG with your best gaming friends. The stakes are serious but the atmosphere is fun. Everyone plays characters that are unique but have aspects of their own personality. The nods to gaming are clear but not heavy handed and they definitely don’t take away from the story. I immediately added the next book to my TBR pile as soon as i finished this one. I highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a fun but not overly silly read.